London 2012 in review: winners and losers

By Ian Jones, MSN news editor Reuters/Max Rossi
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Who's had an Olympics to remember - and to forget?

It's been an incredible two weeks for sport, with the British team winning more Olympic medals than at any Games since 1908. But what about everyone else involved in the London 2012 Olympics? Who are the people, organisations and places who have had a Games to remember - or to forget? Click through to find out.

Rex Features
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Good Games: the royal family

Good Games: the royal family
Whenever a royal turned up to watch Britain compete, the country seemed to win a medal. Their presence at the Olympics appeared to have the opposite effect to that of David Cameron, who was accused of "cursing" the chances of British athletes during the early days of the Games. But while there were boos for the prime minister, there were cheers for the Windsors, whose enthusiastic support for the British team led to as many photo opportunities as it did gold medals.

AP Photo, Chris O'Meara
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Bad Games: corporate ticketholders

Bad Games: corporate ticketholders
The officials in charge of organising the London 2012 Summer Olympics came in for criticism on the very first day of the Games thanks to the number of vacant seats in evidence at events. Sebastian Coe, chairman of the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (Locog), insisted venues were "stuffed to the gunnels". But pictures told a different story. Members of the armed forces were asked to make up the numbers to avoid the venues looking embarrassingly empty. Locog blamed corporate sponsors who weren't using their allocation of tickets. Meanwhile members of the public, who had lost out in the ballot to buy tickets, fumed in front of the frustratingly unresponsive London 2012 website.

Ian West/PA Wire
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Good Games: Yorkshire

Good Games: Yorkshire
The county of Yorkshire was responsible for more of Britain's medals at the London 2012 Olympic Games than any other region of the country. At the time of writing, Yorkshire has provided the UK with six golds, including Sheffield's Jessica Ennis in the heptathlon and Leeds' Alistair Brownlee in the men's triathlon. This represents around 25% of the British team's total haul of golds. The county has also delivered two silvers and three bronzes. The complete medal haul from Yorkshire puts it ahead of the likes of Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand and Jamaica in the overall medal table. Perhaps it's time to rethink the location of the 2012 Games medal parade?

AP Photo, Richard Drew
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Bad Games: NBC

Bad Games: NBC
The American broadcaster invited ridicule for some of its decisions during the Games, such as choosing not to show the men's 100 metres live, and for dropping a segment in the opening ceremony commemorating the victims of the 7/7 bombing in favour of a pre-recorded interview with US swimmer Michael Phelps. Other gaffes included describing Luxembourg as a central European nation, mispronouncing the names of Niger and the Cote D'Ivoire, and failing to recognise the inventor of the world wide web Tim Berners-Lee during the opening ceremony. "If you haven't heard of him, we haven't either," said co-host Meredith Vieira. "Google him," joked co-host Matt Lauer.

Ben Kendall, PA Wire
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Good Games: Boris Johnson

Good Games: Boris Johnson
The mayor of London gave the impression of spending the Games attempting to generate a wacky headline or crazy stunt every single day. Even when things went wrong, such as getting stuck on a zip wire or likening his predictions of transport disruption to Hiroshima, he seemed to get away with it. Boris Johnson emerged from the Games with his reputation enhanced among those who admire him, but with suspicions aroused among those who do not. David Cameron conceded that Johnson had been able to turn even a PR disaster like the zip wire incident into a "triumph", but will be wondering what the mayor's resurgence could mean for his time as prime minister.

John Stillwell/PA Wire
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Bad Games: David Cameron

Bad Games: David Cameron
The prime minister did not enjoy the sort of Games he and his PR team had hoped for. Things got off to a poor start when he was blamed for "cursing" the hopes of Britain's medallists. Whenever David Cameron turned up at an event in which Britain had the chance of getting on the podium, the team ended up missing out completely - such Mark Cavendish in the men's road race and Tom Daley and Pete Waterfield in the diving. There followed a period where the prime minister seemed to be avoiding the events entirely, preferring to hand out cakes to British troops or mingle with visiting dignatories. His luck changed in the second week, when the "curse" disappeared and he witnessed a number of British golds. But Cameron was overshadowed throughout the Games by Tory mayor of London Boris Johnson, for whom even getting stuck on a zip wire was seen as a public relations success. In addition, the PM's efforts at embracing social media did not go to plan, he was booed at a boxing event, and he ended the Games by saying schools need to teach real sports, not Indian dance.

John Stillwell, PA Wire
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Good Games: the armed forces

Good Games: the armed forces
Drafted in at the last minute in to take on the job of keeping the Games safe in place of beleaguered security firm G4S, Britain's armed forces did their country proud. Many troops had to postpone a period of leave, cancel holiday plans and even put weddings on hold. They had to spend the Games in rather basic, even primitive, accommodation sleeping on campbeds and cooking their own meals. They were also used to fill empty seats in venues where corporate ticketholders didn't bother to turn up. Yet throughout the Games they gave the impression of doing their duty without question, without complaint, and with professionalism and dedication. The fact the Olympic Games passed off without any security scare whatsoever is tribute to their sterling work.

David Davies, PA Wire
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Bad Games: G4S

Bad Games: G4S
The private security firm G4S had an embarrassing Games. Once it became clear that they could not provide enough personnel to patrol and supervise London 2012, the government had to call in the army. Controversy flared up over who told what to whom and when, with home secretary Theresa May insisting that the gap in the numbers only became clear on 11 July, not two weeks earlier when the firm first reported problems. When G4S chief executive Nick Buckles was grilled by MPs, he agreed the affair had been "a humiliating shambles" but insisted he was "right for the job".

AP Photo, Matt Dunham
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Good Games: Danny Boyle

Good Games: Danny Boyle
The Olympics opening ceremony was greeted with near-universal praise. Its mixture of imagination, charm, cheek and poignancy won glowing tributes from politicians and the press both in the UK and around the world. The man responsible, film director Danny Boyle, was hailed as a creative genius whose flair and organisation had delivered something universally entertaining yet also profoundly British. The highlights included a singing-and-dancing tribute to the NHS, James Bond collecting the Queen from Buckingham Palace, a journey back through the musical hits of the last 50 years, a stunning depiction of the industrial revolution, and the lighting of the Olympic flame by seven young athletes from the next generation of Olympic hopefuls.

Andrew Parsons/PA
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Bad Games: Aidan Burley

Bad Games: Aidan Burley
The Conservative MP Aidan Burley raised eyebrows when he tweeted of how the Olympics opening ceremony was "leftie multi-cultural crap" and how he would have preferred to see the "Red Arrows [who actually appeared in the ceremony], Shakespeare [ditto] and the Rolling Stones [ditto]." He also described the ceremony as more "leftie" than "Beijing, the capital of a communist state!" Mr Burley later tried to clarify his remarks, tweeting: "Seems my tweet has been misunderstood. I was talking about the way it was handled in the show, not multiculturalism itself." But his words were criticised by David Cameron. "What [Mr Burley] said was completely wrong," the prime minister said. "I think an idiotic thing to say".

Owen Humphreys, PA Wire
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Good Games: Transport for London

Good Games: Transport for London
In the weeks and months leading up to the Games, the media forecast impending meltdown for London's transport network. Melodramatic messages from mayor Boris Johnson were broadcast over loudspeakers across the capital, warning Londoners to prepare for millions of extra travellers and widespread disruption. Many businesses and organisations made plans to allow employees to spend the two weeks of the Games working at home. But in the event, the city functioned remarkably well. Transport for London, the body responsible for running the capital's public transport, did a commendable job. There were no crises, few hiccups, and certainly no meltdown. Its army of extra pink-jacketed helpers, along with all its regular drivers and staff, kept London moving with impressive efficiency and courtesy.

Jeff Moore, Empics Entertainment
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Bad Games: taxi drivers

Bad Games: taxi drivers
London's black cab drivers complained throughout the Games at changes to the capital's road network introduced by Transport for London. As well as the disruption caused by restricted access to some of London's busiest - and most lucrative - thoroughfares, cabbies endured the so-called "Zil lanes": stretches of road reserved for the exclusive use of Games vehicles, such as athletes' coaches and cars belonging to Olympic officials. Some drivers spoke of reduced takings, or simply left London for two weeks to take an extended holiday.