In pictures: Scott's expedition to the Antarctic

By MSN UK News Time Life Pictures/Mansell/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images
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A photo gallery marking the 100th anniversary of Captain Scott reaching the South Pole

On 17 January 1912, Captain Robert Falcon Scott and four others arrived at the South Pole. They had hoped to make history and be the first people ever to reach their destination, but discovered they had been beaten by a Norwegian team led by Roald Amundsen. Click through the images to see more of Scott's heroic but ultimately fatal quest.

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The Terra Nova

Scott's ship, the Terra Nova, sailed from Cardiff on 15 June 1910. It made its way via South Africa, Australia and New Zealand to the edge of Antarctica, arriving off Ross Island on 4 January 1911. This picture shows the ship near Ross Island on 7 January 1911.

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Grub's up

Scott's base was called Camp Evans. Various prefabricated huts and tents were put up during January 1911 in which the expedition crew - a total of 65 men - lived and worked. Here the cook Thomas Clissold makes pies.

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Music while you work

Dog handler Cecil Meares entertains himself at the pianola in one of huts at Camp Evans.

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Sketching Antarctica

Much of 1911 was spent by Scott and his team exploring and charting the area. In this picture, Dr Edward Adrian Wilson, chief scientist on the mission, works on a sketch. Wilson was Scott's closest confidant and was a distinguished research zoologist and talented illustrator.

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A tasty snack

A member of the team tucks into a tin of Heinz baked beans.

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Music for dogs

Many animals were brought along to aid the expedition. Here, Chris the sled dog listens to a gramophone.

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Icy solitude

A penguin wanders across the pack ice in the Ross Dependency of Antarctica.

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Ice grotto

Geologist Thomas Taylor and meteorologist Charles Wright, two members of the expedition team, are pictured standing in the entrance to an ice grotto on 5 January 1911.

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Terra Nova

A view of the Terra Nova, moored to the ice sheet off Ross Island on 16 January 1911.

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Time for tea

Three expedition members sit around a camping stove on Ross Island on 7 February 1911.

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A walk in the snow

Thomas Clissold leads an Emperor penguin by a rope.

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A quick trim

Anton Omelchenko cuts Patrick Keohane's hair at Camp Evans on Ross Island.

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Happy birthday

Scott (at the head of the table) celebrates his 43rd birthday at camp on 6 June 1911.

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Lieutenant Henry Robertson Bowers

A portrait of one of Scott's key men, Henry Bowers. These and many other images from the expedition were taken by the photographer Herbert Ponting.

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Matterhorn Berg

A man stands on top of the Matterhorn Berg on Ross Island on 8 October 1911. The active volcano Mount Erebus is in the background.

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Final journey

Advance parties in Scott's trek to the South Pole left Camp Evans on 24 October 1911. The others, including Scott, followed on 1 November. The polar glacier was reached on 20 December. In early January 1912, Scott began the final leg of his journey. He chose Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates, Edward Wilson and Edgar Evans to accompany him.

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The South Pole

Scott and his party arrived at the pole on 17 January 1912. They were devastated to discover they had been beaten. Scott wrote in his diary: "The Pole. Yes, but under very different circumstances from those expected... Great God! This is an awful place and terrible enough for us to have laboured to it without the reward of priority."

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Last words

The final page of Scott's journal, written on 29 March 1912 - the presumed date of his death. It was recovered eight months later by a search party, along with the bodies of Scott, Wilson and Bowers. Evans died on 17 February after collapsing near a glacier. Oates had stepped out of the tent on 17 March, saying: "I am just going outside and I may be some time." He was never seen again. The text reads: "We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker, of course, and the end cannot be far. It seems a pity but I do not think I can write more. R. Scott. For God's sake look after our people."

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Memorial

A black-edged postcard issued in December 1912.

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Robert Falcon Scott, 1868-1912

An official portrait of Scott, dressed in his uniform of a naval officer.