New species discovered

By Rex Features/PA/MSN UK News AP Photo/NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program
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A deep-sea Chimaera

This image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows a deep-sea Chimaera.

Chimaeras shared an evolutionary history with sharks until around 400 millions years ago, when their lineage branched into an isolated group. According to scientists the lateral lines running across this chimaera are mechano-receptors that detect pressure waves, a little like ears. The dotted-looking lines on the frontal portion of the face (near the mouth) are ampullae de lorenzini and they detect perturbations in electrical fields generated by living organisms.

 
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Purple octopus

This unidentified purple octopus was one of 11 potentially new species found during a deep-sea expedition off Canada's Atlantic coast during July 2010. A team of 27 Canadian and Spanish researchers used a remotely operated vehicle (called ROPOS) deployed from the Canadian Coastguard ship Hudson to dive to the bottom of the sea.

Rex Features
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'Strawberry' crab

A Taiwanese professor claims to have found a new crab species that looks exactly like a strawberry. Professor He Pinghe of the National Taiwan Ocean University tentatively named the newly discovered crabs "Xin Hua Ban Xie" (new pedal crab), but they were quickly nicknamed "strawberry" crabs due to their distinctive colour and markings.

Prof. Indraneil Das/Rex Features
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Miniature frog

This new species of miniature frog was discovered in August 2010. Microhyla nepenthicola, shown here on the tip of a pencil, is about the size of a pea. It was found inside and around pitcher plants in the heath forests of the south-east Asian island of Borneo. The amphibian is one of a species of microhylid, composed of miniature frogs under 15 millimeters in size.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada/Rex Features
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Sea star

In this photograph a sea star is recovered by a robotic arm off the coast of Newfoundland in Canada. Various encrusting species can be seen in the background. The find was one of a number of discoveries during a 20-day research trip off Canada's Atlantic coast.

AP Photo/NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program
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Sea sponge

Another image from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration taken during the exploration of the Sangihe Talund region off Indonesia. Scientists using cutting-edge technology to capture colourful and diverse images of marine life on the ocean floor, including plate-sized sea spiders and - pictured here - flower-like sponges that appear to be carnivorous.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada/Rex Features
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Unidentified octopus

Not all of the species discovered during July's expedition off the coast of Newfoundland in Canada could be identified. This octopus was one such species. Kevin MacIsaac, a Bedford Institute of Oceanography taxonomist, said 30 to 40 species of coral and sponges were found, although there were several species he could not identify. "It was kind of embarrassing," he said. "Time and time again, we were going forward and saying, 'We don't know what it is.' And, they'd say, 'What do you mean, you don't know what it is?'"

AP Photo/NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program
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Sea lily

This image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows a close-up of the red arms of a sea lily living 516 metres below the surface of the ocean in the Sangihe Talaud region off Indonesia.

AP Photo/NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program
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Octopus

This image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows an unidentified octopus in the Sangihe Talaud region off the coast of Indonesia. Scientists involved in the expedition believe they may have discovered as many as 40 new plant and animal species.