Cabinet reshuffle: winners and losers

By Ian Jones, MSN news editor Yui Mok/PA Wire
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Who benefited and who suffered in David Cameron's ministerial shake-up

The prime minister has carried out the first major reshuffle of his government. Who among David Cameron's new top team has got most reason to celebrate - and who has most cause for commiseration? Click through to find out.

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Winner: Ken Clarke

Winner: Ken Clarke
The veteran MP had been tipped to lose not just his job as justice secretary but a seat in the cabinet. Instead he keeps his cabinet rank as a "minister without portfolio", advising the government on economic policy. Mr Clarke told reporters he was "pleasantly surprised" to remain in the cabinet, adding: "At my age you do occasionally have to step down from a heavy departmental role before you suddenly realise you can no longer quite handle it."

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Loser: Andrew Lansley

Loser: Andrew Lansley
The health secretary is one of the biggest casualties of the reshuffle, being demoted to the more junior role of leader of the House of Commons. Mr Lansley had been in charge of introducing a controversial shake-up of the NHS in England. It took almost two years to get through parliament and united almost the entire medical establishment in opposition to the government.

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Winner: Chris Grayling

Winner: Chris Grayling
The man promoted to replace Ken Clarke as justice secretary was left out of David Cameron's first cabinet, following comments he made in April 2010 saying bed and breakfast owners had the right to turn away gay couples. He is now responsible for, among other things, human rights legislation.

 
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Loser: Jeremy Hunt

Loser: Jeremy Hunt
It's difficult to see how being given the role of health secretary can be seen as a "win", particularly as Mr Hunt is inheriting the job from Andrew Lansley. Despite Mr Hunt saying he is "incredibly honoured" to leave his job as culture secretary and take responsibility for the NHS, stating "it is a huge task and the biggest privilege of my life," he faces a tough task in continuing to promote the benefits of the government's radical shake-up of the health service in England.

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Winner: Michael Gove

Winner: Michael Gove
The education secretary is seen by David Cameron as one of the stars of the coalition government, and there had been talk of Mr Gove being moved to the department of health or work and pensions. He stays where he is, where he will welcome the chance to continue to push through radical reforms of the education system in England, including the scrapping of GCSEs.

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Loser: Baroness Warsi

Loser: Baroness Warsi
Despite using a recent article in the Daily Telegraph to argue she should keep her job as co-chair of the Tory party, Baroness Warsi has been removed from this role and given two new tasks: a minister at the foreign office and a minister for faith and communities. She tweeted: "It's been a privilege and an honour to serve my party as co-chairman, signing off @ToryChairman."

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Winner: David Laws

Winner: David Laws
The former Liberal Democrat cabinet minister has returned to the government as a junior education minister. Mr Laws resigned two years ago as chief secretary to the Treasury after admitting he claimed expenses to pay his partner's rent.

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Loser: Justine Greening

Loser: Justine Greening
The transport secretary has lost her job after just 10 months in the role. She was an outspoken critic of the idea of building a third runway at Heathrow airport, and has been replaced by former chief whip Patrick McLoughlin. Her removal could be seen as evidence the runway is now being seriously considered by senior government ministers. It was noted that Miss Greening did not appear too happy when leaving Downing Street after being told of her new role as secretary for international development.

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Winner: Maria Miller

Winner: Maria Miller
The reshuffle has brought a big promotion for Maria Miller, who replaces Jeremy Hunt as culture secretary. She was previously a disabilities minister and had not been tipped for a major role in the cabinet. She will now be responsible for, among other things, overseeing the legacy of London 2012.

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Loser: Cheryl Gillan

Loser: Cheryl Gillan
The former Welsh secretary is reportedly unhappy being relieved of her job - especially as she has not been given another one in return. Sources said Gillan was "gutted" to lose her cabinet post, although she said she had enjoyed her two years in the role. Her successor, Clwyd West MP David Jones, has been Gillan's number two in the Wales Office since 2010.

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Winner: Iain Duncan Smith

Winner: Iain Duncan Smith
The work and pensions secretary was asked by David Cameron to move to the justice department to replace Ken Clarke. But Mr Duncan Smith refused, saying he preferred to stay where he was. He got his way, forcing the prime minister to rearrange his plans and find someone else to take the justice job. Mr Duncan Smith's position - and reputation - is now significantly strengthened.

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Loser: George Osborne

Loser: George Osborne
The chancellor of the exchequer was never likely to be axed by his close friend David Cameron, despite wicked whispers in the press. However he has not benefited from the reshuffle. Mr Osborne will now have to co-operate - or contend - with the views of Ken Clarke, the cabinet's new "economic adviser". Mr Cameron's changes will not have any significant impact on the performance of the British economy, for which Mr Osborne will continue to be held solely responsible. Furthermore, the reputation of the entire government hinges on the likelihood of an economic recovery, which every single new minister will be desperately hoping Mr Osborne can deliver.